Untitled

Sep 12

ALL LEATHER MUST BE BOILED: 9.11.13 -

boiledleather:

Back on the road, the septon said, “We would do well to keep a watch tonight, my friends. The villagers say they’ve seen three broken men skulking round the dunes, west of the old watchtower.”

“Only three?” Ser Hyle smiled. “Three is honey to our swordswench. They’re not like to trouble armed…

Mar 23

[video]

Jul 25

headmistressmcgonagall:

bellusmortis:

this is important

it’s like they just had awkward sex and Gary just wants to go home.

headmistressmcgonagall:

bellusmortis:

this is important

it’s like they just had awkward sex and Gary just wants to go home.

(Source: herekitty, via oldfilmsflicker)

Jul 13

[video]

May 30

[video]

Mar 02

OneShar.es -

minimalmac:

onethingwell:

OneShar.es lets you share confidential text. Submit your top secret info via the website, iOS or Android app and you’ll receive a URL to share. Once someone accesses the URL, your message is displayed once then immediately deleted from OneShar.es servers.

Needless to say, your text is encrypted before sending to OneShar.es, and stored in encrypted form.

Mac App Store / Android Market

Thanks, zool

Gosh, I can think of a half dozen times I could have used this in the last 24 hours alone. Great find.

Feb 17

[video]

Feb 11

joshuanguyen:

Apart from the all the stuff that’s not essential tacked on like barnacles to Facebook’s interface (groups, events, ask a question, apps, newsticker, chat, search(es)), here are a few of my annoyances. To be honest, I’ve found myself checking in on Facebook more in recent weeks - not sure why - and each time, I increasingly get more annoyed.
#1 - Creepy and kind of lame.  I don’t really need to or want to know that my friend B is reading that article. It just adds a whole bunch of short-term reactions that have no basis in any sort of broader understanding.
#2 - If I click on those lists and actually try to manage them, it’s like a worm hole that I’ll never get out of.
#3 - Annoying. The average number of friends a user has on Facebook is ~300.  That’s close to 1 birthday each day for the year.  It’s fucking annoying. Mostly because I don’t care enough to do anything about this person’s birthday because I haven’t seen or talked to them in years.  The only birthdays that matter are the ones where we invite each other to our birthday parties.  The backslap full of shit happy birthday messages on Facebook just underscores how fake the connections really are.
#4 - So I’ve been posting a lot about Jeremy Lin.  But don’t tell me to ‘Like” some page that I’ll never go to.  This is the apex of what ‘social media strategy’ is today.  There has got to be a better way.  And I guess I should really look into digital media degrees and intelligence analysis.  So awesome that Stuff I don’t Care About will take up 1/3 of the screen.
#5 - Like, Comment, Date, xyz, blah blah like, view more likes, view more comments, view this comment, no view this other comment, look at this comment, write a comment, run on the wheel you hamster.  FML.

This pretty much sums up the current fb experience.

joshuanguyen:

Apart from the all the stuff that’s not essential tacked on like barnacles to Facebook’s interface (groups, events, ask a question, apps, newsticker, chat, search(es)), here are a few of my annoyances. To be honest, I’ve found myself checking in on Facebook more in recent weeks - not sure why - and each time, I increasingly get more annoyed.

#1 - Creepy and kind of lame.  I don’t really need to or want to know that my friend B is reading that article. It just adds a whole bunch of short-term reactions that have no basis in any sort of broader understanding.

#2 - If I click on those lists and actually try to manage them, it’s like a worm hole that I’ll never get out of.

#3 - Annoying. The average number of friends a user has on Facebook is ~300.  That’s close to 1 birthday each day for the year.  It’s fucking annoying. Mostly because I don’t care enough to do anything about this person’s birthday because I haven’t seen or talked to them in years.  The only birthdays that matter are the ones where we invite each other to our birthday parties.  The backslap full of shit happy birthday messages on Facebook just underscores how fake the connections really are.

#4 - So I’ve been posting a lot about Jeremy Lin.  But don’t tell me to ‘Like” some page that I’ll never go to.  This is the apex of what ‘social media strategy’ is today.  There has got to be a better way.  And I guess I should really look into digital media degrees and intelligence analysis.  So awesome that Stuff I don’t Care About will take up 1/3 of the screen.

#5 - Like, Comment, Date, xyz, blah blah like, view more likes, view more comments, view this comment, no view this other comment, look at this comment, write a comment, run on the wheel you hamster.  FML.

This pretty much sums up the current fb experience.

Jan 21

Kill Hollywood, Not Movies

parislemon:

The fallout from the failure of SOPA and PIPA is just as interesting as the main topics themselves. First, many on the web with loud voices are finally waking up to how corrupt the lobbying/political system is in this country. Second, directly-related, there’s a quickly growing anti-Hollywood sentiment.

The most forceful stance has to be Y Combinator putting out a new RFS (Request for Startups) will one goal: Kill Hollywood

It’s an important statement and message given the bullshit the MPAA is up to. But it’s also important to separate film, the artform, from Hollywood, the industry.

Read More

Jan 19

brycedotvc:

In the book I’m reading,The Talent Code, the author showcases a 1997 study which asked why some kids make massive performance progress when taking piano lessons and some do not. 
After looking at a wide range of variables- IQ, aural sensitivity, math skills, rhythm, sensorimotor skills, income level- the researchers stumbled on an answer in a question they’d asked the children before they ever slid their stool to the keyboard.
The question? How long do you think you’ll play your new instrument?
As you can see in the graph above, the correlation between long-term commitment and pace of improvement were eye opening. From the book:

I couldn’t believe my eyes. Progress was not determined by any measurable aptitude or trait, but by a tiny powerful idea the child had before even starting lessons. The differences were staggering. With the same amount of practice the long-term-commitment group outperformed the short-term-commitment group by 400%. The long-term-commitment group with, with a mere 20 minutes of weekly practice, progressed faster than the short-termers who practiced for an hour and a half. When long-term-commitment combined with high levels of practice, skills skyrocketed. 

As in piano, entrepreneurship sees its fair share of tourists. Toe dippers, looking for a thrill, occasionally take the plunge yet continue keeping an eye on that safe and inviting shoreline. Inevitably, they all swim back via quick flips, acqihires or giving up once they figure out that being a founder isn’t nearly as cool as they thought it would be.
And I don’t blame them. This startups stuff is hard on every level.
But there are a group of founders with a long-term commitment to practicing the skill of turning small companies into impactful businesses. And they made the decision, before they ever started or joined a company, that the path of entrepreneurship was for them. 
This doesn’t mean they’ll never give up on their current idea. Nor, does it mean they won’t work within a large company. It means that the decisions they make and the experiences they accumulate will be feeding that long-term commitment to honing their craft as entrepreneurs.
PS- you can read the whole chapter this graph comes from here.

brycedotvc:

In the book I’m reading,The Talent Code, the author showcases a 1997 study which asked why some kids make massive performance progress when taking piano lessons and some do not. 

After looking at a wide range of variables- IQ, aural sensitivity, math skills, rhythm, sensorimotor skills, income level- the researchers stumbled on an answer in a question they’d asked the children before they ever slid their stool to the keyboard.

The question? How long do you think you’ll play your new instrument?

As you can see in the graph above, the correlation between long-term commitment and pace of improvement were eye opening. From the book:

I couldn’t believe my eyes. Progress was not determined by any measurable aptitude or trait, but by a tiny powerful idea the child had before even starting lessons. The differences were staggering. With the same amount of practice the long-term-commitment group outperformed the short-term-commitment group by 400%. The long-term-commitment group with, with a mere 20 minutes of weekly practice, progressed faster than the short-termers who practiced for an hour and a half. When long-term-commitment combined with high levels of practice, skills skyrocketed. 

As in piano, entrepreneurship sees its fair share of tourists. Toe dippers, looking for a thrill, occasionally take the plunge yet continue keeping an eye on that safe and inviting shoreline. Inevitably, they all swim back via quick flips, acqihires or giving up once they figure out that being a founder isn’t nearly as cool as they thought it would be.

And I don’t blame them. This startups stuff is hard on every level.

But there are a group of founders with a long-term commitment to practicing the skill of turning small companies into impactful businesses. And they made the decision, before they ever started or joined a company, that the path of entrepreneurship was for them. 

This doesn’t mean they’ll never give up on their current idea. Nor, does it mean they won’t work within a large company. It means that the decisions they make and the experiences they accumulate will be feeding that long-term commitment to honing their craft as entrepreneurs.

PS- you can read the whole chapter this graph comes from here.